Andon 67

October 2000

Andon 67

EDITORIAL: When you come across a Japanese print showing two people with a cup of sake between them and presenting a certain number of fingers towards the opponent it most certainly depicts people playing ken, a Japanese drinking game of Chinese origin. Sepp Linhart has taken a special interest in this game and gives us a scholarly overview of its history, explaining different aspects of ken and showing several ukiyo-e depicting the game. Among the ukiyo-e shown there are no paintings illustrating the ken game and this might be a good reason for Jon de Jong, who has a special interest in paintings, to see whether he can find one. In this issue of Andon Jon shows two paintings of blossoming plum trees and tells us about its painter Ganku, founder of the Kishi school. From Ganku's paintings to Kōgyo's woodblock prints of Nō plays is, in my opinion no big step. As a collector of Japanese prints Claus-Peter Schulz took a special interest in the series Nōgaku hyakuban, designed by Tsukioka Kōgyo between July 1922 and February 1926. Yout might have examples of this magnificently printed series in your own collection. Good news for those trying to decipher the cryptic kanji on the prints. Your troubles are over because with his article Claus-Peter provides a complete list giving all the play titles and dates of publication. I hope you will enjoy reading this issue of Andon.

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